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Henry IV, Part 1

Audiobook

ACT IScene 1. King Henry's plans to lead a crusade to the Holy Land are frustrated when he hears that an English army under Edmund Mortimer has been defeated by the Welsh chieftan Owen Glendower. Henry reveals that Harry Percy, known as Hotspur, has defeated the Scottish Earl of Douglas in battle. Thinking of his son, unruly Hal, the King envies the valiant Hotspur's father, the Lord Northumberland. The King's council is to convene on the following Wednesday when Hotspur will be made to account for his giving the king only one of his hostages.Scene 2. Ned Poins tries to persuade Prince Hal and his friend, the debauched knight Sir John Falstaff, to take part in a robbery at Gadshill. The Prince reuses but is finally persuaded by Poins, who has a secret scheme to expose Falstaff for the coward he is. Once alone, Hal muses on his unprincely behavior, comparing himself to the sun, who allows himself to be covered by the clouds, only to appear more brilliant when he emerges from the "ugly mists."Scene 3. King Henry angrily dismisses Worcester when the Earl reminds him that it was his family that first put Henry on the throne. Hotspur claims that his irritation at the arrival of a foppish courtier on the battlefield has been misinterpreted as a refusal to give up prisoners to the king. However, he will only agree to surrender them if the King ransoms Mortimer, Hotspur's brother-in-law. Henry is incensed: Mortimer, he says, is a traitor, having married his captor Owen Glendower's daughter. Unmoved by Hotspur's impassioned defense of Mortimer, he warns, "Send us your prisoners, or you will hear of it." Northumberland restrains the enraged Hotspur. Worcester reminds them that the King's hostility to Mortimer stems from the fact that he, not Henry, is Richard II's rightful heir. When Hotspur finally calms down, his uncles suggests that they raise a rebellion against the King, relying on the support of Glendower, Douglas, Mortimer, and the Archbishop of York.

ACT IIScene 1. Gadshill hears that there are wealthy travelers on the road: an ideal prey for their planned robbery.Scene 2. Falstaff and his cronies rob the travelers, and are, in turn, assaulted by Hal and Poins, who are in disguise.Scene 3. Hotspur's wife Kate begs him to tell her why he is so abstracted, but he warns her not to question him further.Scene 4. Prince Hal is relaxing in an Eastcheap tavern when Falstaff arrives and recounts how he fought off eleven men. When Hal reveals that the two assailants were, in fact, Poins and himself, Falstaff is unabashed, claiming that he recognized Hal all along, and would not have killed the heir apparent. A messenger arrives from the King, summoning the Prince to court in the morning: the rebels are rising. Hal is concerned at the prospect of being horribly "chid" by his father the king but Falstaff persuades him to practice an answer. A Sheriff arrives to arrest Falstaff for his part in the robbery, but Hal lies to protect his friend. The stolen money, he says, will be paid back with interest.

ACT IIIScene 1. The rebels gather at Glendower's castle in Wales. Hotspur and Glendower quarrel over the division of the Kingdom, though Hotspur is finally pacified. The wives of Hotspur and Mortimer enter and the rebels seem at amity.Scene 2. The king upbraids Hal for his unprincely behavior. Hal begs forgiveness, promising that he will match the brave Hotspur in valor. Scene 3. Falstaff claims that he has had his pockets picked in the tavern, but the Hostess hotly denies it. Hal arrives and banters with Falstaff, before setting off for the war.

ACT IVScene 1. In their camp near Shrewsbury, the rebels receive word that Northumberland is sick and cannot join the campaign....


Expand title description text
Publisher: Blackstone Publishing Edition: Audio Theater

OverDrive Listen audiobook

  • ISBN: 9780792751625
  • File size: 79873 KB
  • Release date: June 15, 2008
  • Duration: 02:46:24

MP3 audiobook

  • ISBN: 9780792751625
  • File size: 79882 KB
  • Release date: June 15, 2008
  • Duration: 02:48:23
  • Number of parts: 3

Formats

OverDrive Listen audiobook
MP3 audiobook

Languages

English

ACT IScene 1. King Henry's plans to lead a crusade to the Holy Land are frustrated when he hears that an English army under Edmund Mortimer has been defeated by the Welsh chieftan Owen Glendower. Henry reveals that Harry Percy, known as Hotspur, has defeated the Scottish Earl of Douglas in battle. Thinking of his son, unruly Hal, the King envies the valiant Hotspur's father, the Lord Northumberland. The King's council is to convene on the following Wednesday when Hotspur will be made to account for his giving the king only one of his hostages.Scene 2. Ned Poins tries to persuade Prince Hal and his friend, the debauched knight Sir John Falstaff, to take part in a robbery at Gadshill. The Prince reuses but is finally persuaded by Poins, who has a secret scheme to expose Falstaff for the coward he is. Once alone, Hal muses on his unprincely behavior, comparing himself to the sun, who allows himself to be covered by the clouds, only to appear more brilliant when he emerges from the "ugly mists."Scene 3. King Henry angrily dismisses Worcester when the Earl reminds him that it was his family that first put Henry on the throne. Hotspur claims that his irritation at the arrival of a foppish courtier on the battlefield has been misinterpreted as a refusal to give up prisoners to the king. However, he will only agree to surrender them if the King ransoms Mortimer, Hotspur's brother-in-law. Henry is incensed: Mortimer, he says, is a traitor, having married his captor Owen Glendower's daughter. Unmoved by Hotspur's impassioned defense of Mortimer, he warns, "Send us your prisoners, or you will hear of it." Northumberland restrains the enraged Hotspur. Worcester reminds them that the King's hostility to Mortimer stems from the fact that he, not Henry, is Richard II's rightful heir. When Hotspur finally calms down, his uncles suggests that they raise a rebellion against the King, relying on the support of Glendower, Douglas, Mortimer, and the Archbishop of York.

ACT IIScene 1. Gadshill hears that there are wealthy travelers on the road: an ideal prey for their planned robbery.Scene 2. Falstaff and his cronies rob the travelers, and are, in turn, assaulted by Hal and Poins, who are in disguise.Scene 3. Hotspur's wife Kate begs him to tell her why he is so abstracted, but he warns her not to question him further.Scene 4. Prince Hal is relaxing in an Eastcheap tavern when Falstaff arrives and recounts how he fought off eleven men. When Hal reveals that the two assailants were, in fact, Poins and himself, Falstaff is unabashed, claiming that he recognized Hal all along, and would not have killed the heir apparent. A messenger arrives from the King, summoning the Prince to court in the morning: the rebels are rising. Hal is concerned at the prospect of being horribly "chid" by his father the king but Falstaff persuades him to practice an answer. A Sheriff arrives to arrest Falstaff for his part in the robbery, but Hal lies to protect his friend. The stolen money, he says, will be paid back with interest.

ACT IIIScene 1. The rebels gather at Glendower's castle in Wales. Hotspur and Glendower quarrel over the division of the Kingdom, though Hotspur is finally pacified. The wives of Hotspur and Mortimer enter and the rebels seem at amity.Scene 2. The king upbraids Hal for his unprincely behavior. Hal begs forgiveness, promising that he will match the brave Hotspur in valor. Scene 3. Falstaff claims that he has had his pockets picked in the tavern, but the Hostess hotly denies it. Hal arrives and banters with Falstaff, before setting off for the war.

ACT IVScene 1. In their camp near Shrewsbury, the rebels receive word that Northumberland is sick and cannot join the campaign....


Expand title description text